Prefigurations of the Posthuman

This is an ongoing series of publications that wishes to establish a genealogy of literary/philosophical precursors and prefigurations of the posthuman.

Appeared so far:

As a next move, we have been planning a volume on:

Joyce-Stick – Call for contributions:

Joyce-Stick

Joyce-Stick: Gaming with James Joyce

Eds Stefan Herbrechter & Ivan Callus

Playfulness, games and the ludic are well established themes in studies of James Joyce’s work. We would like to put together a volume that explores new contexts of Joycean play and reconfigures Joyce criticism and theoretical interventions that have been exploring the notion of play through Joyce. We’re particularly interested in extending the investigation of existing aspects of ludicity into the current, “hyperludic”, digital environment. Is there any evidence of a Joycean influence on, or even a Joycean anticipation of, current, arguably “posthumanist” trends? Can one think these processes of (re)mediation through Joyce’s texts? Or are literature’s digital platforms falling short and shy of the stakes set by Joyce for the literature that follows upon his Wake? In short, we’d like to find out what the relationship between Joyce, digitality and “post/homo ludens” might be.

Some starting points might be:

Joyce and hypertext
Joycean moves or in digital or videogames
Multi- or Hypermedia Joyce
Remediating Joyce
Games and New Joyce effects
Post-poststructuralist Joyce
Joyce, invention, future
Cyber- or Techno-Joyce
Joyce and “prefigurations” of the posthuman
Joycean forms of electracy
Bio-, Cogno-, Neuro-, Info-, Nano-… Joyce
Joyce-machines, Joy(ce) sticks or pads…
3-D Joyce
Joyce and code
Retro-Joyce
Etc.

 

University of Florida Press (Florida James Joyce Series) have expressed an interest in receiving the manuscript for this volume.

Confirmed contributors so far are:

Jean-Michel Rabaté (University of Pennsylvania)
Laurent Milesi (Cardiff University)
Ruben Borg (The Hebrew University of Jerusalem)
 
 
Please send preliminary expressions of interest, or titles, abstracts and bios to:
 
Stefan Herbrechter stefan.herbrechter@coventry.ac.uk, Reader in Cultural Theory at Coventry University, UK; and Ivan Callus ivan.callus@um.edu.mt, Professor of English and Head of Department at University of Malta.
 
Stefan and Ivan have published a number of volumes and collections together: Posthumanist Shakespeares (Palgrave, 2012 forthcoming), Cy-Borges: Memories of the Posthuman in the Work of Jorge Luis Borges (Bucknell UP, 2009), Post-Theory, Culture Criticism (Rodopi, 2004), Discipline and Practice: The (Ir)resistibility of Theory (Bucknell UP, 2004). They are also editors of the Brill series Critical Posthumanisms and co-authors of the first, name-giving, volume in this series (forthcoming in 2016).